Topic: science on a sphere

Tuesday, March 15, 2011

In the wake of the devastating earthquake in Japan, tsunamis are on people's minds.  How much do you know about them?  Take this brief tsunami quiz and find out: 1.  Name 4 geologic events that might cause a tsunami. 2.  Tsunamis are also called wave trains...

Thursday, December 30, 2010

Besides highly publicized science stories of 2010 (Gulf oil spill, Chilean miner rescue, bedbugs, etc.), there were some intriguing and somewhat odd science stories: 1. You think like a worm – The human brain’s center of deep thought is curiously similar to a clump of neurons...

Tuesday, December 14, 2010

Tuesday, December 21, is the Winter Solstice and usually considered the first day of winter. However, meteorological winter is already here! So what’s the deal? Well, the definition of winter depends on whom you ask. A meteorologist defines winter as the three coldest months of the...

Monday, December 13, 2010

It's snowing!  Snow showers are also predicted for Thursday and a winter storm might hit us this weekend.  Remember last December?  Now for the Question of the Week: What is the percent chance of a white Christmas in Richmond (in any given year)? Answer:...

Tuesday, August 24, 2010

As Hurricane Danielle churns far out in the Atlantic, I am reminded of another hurricane that made landfall on this day… On August 24, 1992, a small but extremely intense Hurricane Andrew slammed into South Florida. Andrew made landfall as a Category 5 hurricane, the 3rd most intense...

Friday, August 20, 2010

For an incredible 33 years, Voyager 2 has been our eyes of discovery in the outer solar system and beyond. This venerable spacecraft has been in continuous operation more than 12,000 days, sending us compelling photos and information about the gas giants of the solar system: Jupiter, Saturn,...

Thursday, July 15, 2010

By Ben Remo Science Museum of Virginia intern   Residents of the east coast may have noticed an increase in heat lately. This increase has led to scorching temperatures of over 100 degrees. Most might be asking, how can this possibly happen? Why should we be subjected to such a...

Thursday, July 8, 2010

Have you met Chrysaora quinquecirrha? If you’ve spent time in the Chesapeake Bay in the summertime, you probably have. His more familiar name is sea nettle, and he is not one of the most pleasant fellows you will ever meet. The sea nettle is a large sea jelly, a semi-transparent bell-shaped...

Wednesday, May 26, 2010

As officials make another attempt to cap the well spilling oil into the Gulf of Mexico, Virginians might be asking, “Could oil show up here?” As of now, it appears a large oil slick on Virginia waterways is unlikely, but oil residue in the form of tar balls could wash up on local...

Thursday, April 22, 2010

Eyjafjallajökull? Can you pronounce it? Apparently, it’s: “AY-uh-fyat-luh-YOE-kuutl(-uh).” If that helps, good for you! Even after hearing an Iceland native pronounce it, I still can’t manage to wrap my tongue around that many syllables. First, a little geography...
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